April 6, 2021

S2:E6 Nick | Vaccine Spotter Dot Org


Are you having difficulty locating a vaccine appointment? Do you wish there was a website that contained information for ALL your local pharmacies instead of having 20+ individual tabs open for each one? Well look no further! www.vaccinespotter.org is the one-stop shop for all your vaccine appointment needs! "A tool to help you track down COVID-19 vaccine appointment openings at your state's pharmacies. Updated every minute. Rather than searching around on each pharmacy's website, we'll automatically scan the pharmacy websites and show you any available appointments we can find on one page."

And today we interviewed the guy behind all of it: Nick is a regular guy with a big heart and has put his software engineering skills to good use. When he heard his coworkers' frustrations about finding appointments for their elderly loved ones, he knew he could help. A month later, vaccinespotter.org is up and running and helping hundreds of people access their dose of the Fauci-Ouchie. This feel-good story is a lovely reminder that there are good people out there...which has inspired us to focus this month on people who have pivoted and helped others amidst the pandemic. Stay tuned!

Transcript
Caroline Amos:

Hi, I'm Carolyn Amos.

Raymond McAnally:

And I'm Raymond McAnally.

Caroline Raymond:

And we are Fatigued (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

First of all, you're very cool. You're a very cool dude, because you've created this website called Vaccine Spotter, and you are exactly - you've created the thing that everybody has a need of right now. Tell us where did that where did that begin? How did you do it?

Nick:

Um, well, yeah, I'm glad that hopefully it's useful to others. Yeah, it started, um, I guess about a month ago at this point. It really stemmed from talking with coworkers and sort of hearing what sort of issues they were facing trying to find vaccine appointments for their parents. So that's how it all really started was, you know, just I think for a while I had been hearing and witnessing a lot of the frustration and just sort of secondhand of a lot of these people trying to find vaccine appointments, here in Colorado, which is where I'm located for their parents and loved ones. And, you know, it's a tricky process to navigate. And so finally, at one point, I think one of my co workers had read an article about I think someone doing something sort of similar in New York City that was sort of specific to the New York City area. And she was like, Is there anything we could do for Colorado? Like, this has been really frustrating and trying to find things for my parents? And you know, is there anything that could possibly be done? And I think that's when I sort of the wheels started turn, and I was started to really register how much frustration not just that person I had sort of seen from that person, but from a lot of other co workers. And yeah. Yeah, no, no, she, yeah, she reached out to some of the

Raymond McAnally:

And she came to you because you know nothing bout computers and had to lea people at our office that are that do computer stuff. Full time. cuz you're specifically you're a software engineer. Correct? Correct. Yep. Yeah I know as much about that, as I do. about like, when we talk to the neurologist, or, or anybody with a scientific classification, I do our way out of our league. I don't even know that I can play you on TV (laughter). Everybody has their own things. This is just I just happened to be nerdy in this way. And I like computers. And so well, Well, I think one of the things that really stuck out to me when you told us a little bit about yourself in the questionnaire was that you have not had COVID? Correct? Correct. Now, I've definitely been lucky in that regard.

Caroline Amos:

Congrats.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah. So this truly just came out of seeing a need and trying to figure out if you can fill it? Yeah, yeah, it was really just sort of, yeah, sort of seeing a lot of that and just sort of trying to figure out, you know, a lot of people are doing stuff these days that, you know, to help people in the community and just help people in general. And so yeah, this was one sort of way I sort of figured I could maybe put my skill set to use to help others. That's so much more helpful than like starting a podcast. (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, no kidding. I'm curious, what was the process of developing this website? Like, how long did it take? You did? Did you troubleshoot some things? What was the tell us? For those of us who have no idea what it is to be a software engineer? In layman's terms? What that - what is that process like?

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, so I mean, vaccine spotter in its current form, I mean, essentially, the idea behind it is that it will sort of go out and try to gather all of the vaccine appointments at pharmacies across the country and sort of show them to in one place. So the idea is just sort of, to eliminate a lot of that, you know, sort of tiresome process of, you know, trying to get one pharmacy

Caroline Amos:

having 1000 tabs open on Google Chrome.

Nick:

Yes.

Raymond McAnally:

My eligibility opened up on March 15. Here in California, I'm Type 2. And so I immediately realized that there was no central there's a little bit of a central like, gathering of links here through county sites and state sites, but you have to click on each individual one, fill out all the same information, just to find out that there's no vaccine appointments available. It is so frustrating - your website makes it so you know, it's not it's not you know, what was funny to me was your website was so much more effective than what we have currently. Yet, the state website here looks great. And it looks like you know, you made it easy to find stuff, but it's not. It's not about that. It's about getting the information across to people.

Caroline Amos:

Oh, it's so clear. It's so easy to use. I mean, gosh, I imagine that like somebody who might be older and not as tech savvy, if they are given your page would have an easy time trying to find something for themselves. So props to you for that. Was that your intention?

Raymond McAnally:

That's good to hear. I mean, yeah, no. I mean, I'm not particularly a designer. So I mean, it's, yeah, I was just trying to do stuff simple and basic, and just trying to present and throw out as much information as I could. Yeah. And I love the fact that on your site, you also give updates, you let people know that you ask for feedback, you address that feedback, and you make notes of it. on the page, did you? Did you start out intending to cover all 50 states? Or did you just figure out how to do it and realize you could do it for all?

Unknown:

Yeah, so yeah, when I set out to do this, the initial version just covered Colorado. So you know, I was just trying to help some co workers. And so I sort of put together an initial prototype that sort of, sort of scanned some of the local Colorado pharmacies and sort of aggregated all that information in one place. And I could dig deeper and dive deeper in depth sort of explaining how all that works.

Raymond McAnally:

I'm kind of curious, I probably won't know half the terms you use. But I'm am kind of curious.

Caroline Amos:

Someone out there will and they're gonna love this geekspeak! (laughter)

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah. Is that information public?

Nick:

Yeah. So I mean, what what I'm doing is sort of I mean, yeah.

Raymond McAnally:

This is where he tells us he's hacked into the systems at Rite Aid and CVS (laughter)

Nick:

No, I've not done any hacking or anything like that, I mean, all of this, all of these details are public. This is sort

Raymond McAnally:

And why do you think they would need or want to of I mean, this is what's called scraping. So it's sort of is this idea of going out to sort of all these other these websites that exist. So you know, CVS, Walgreens, Walmart, sort of all of these big pharmacy chains, and just trying to automate that process that you're having to do with tons of do that? tabs, you know, and tons of inputs and trying all these different zip codes. And that whole process. Essentially, I'm just sort of automating that through sort of computer programming. Because those are tasks computers are good at and

Nick:

So a lot of these, I want to give the benefit of the you know, are very time consuming for people to do. But it's a lot more efficient, if I can sort of have a computer program go out and sort of check every single zip code or sort of every single store to try to just surface that availability that might otherwise be really hard to track down if you're, if doubt, I think a lot of this just gets caught up in you know, it's just up to you to enter everyone individually. So yeah, I mean, the process is, you know, it's, it tries to do what these are large companies, they have large websites, and they you would do on the website itself. So, you know, again, it's no, it's no different than the information you get publicly. But I, there are things that I tried to do to sort of make that process more efficient than, you know, actually, you know, opening up a browser tab and clicking on links, because that would just be very slow. So the process sort of involves sort of trying to figure out what sort of peeking not necessarily behind the scenes, but sort of seeing what the web page is doing when you interact with it sort of what requests for data, are maybe happening behind the scenes, and then trying to automate that and reproduce that in a way that I can sort of make efficient. But it's challenging. There's all sorts of issues with different pharmacies, sort of blocking this type of access. have things on them that probably just try to prevent this type of scraping or scanning or bot activity.

Raymond McAnally:

And if you were able to get in this way, maybe you could find something they didn't intend for you to have access to. That sort of thing?

Nick:

Yeah I mean, yeah, that is part of it is that you know, that they're some of this is meant to just sort of prevent bots from sort of exploring and crawling sites -

Caroline Amos:

Doing their bot thing? (laughter)

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, doing their bot thing. Some of it may also be competitive, you know, maybe they don't want other competitors scraping their site to find prices and stuff like that, you know, for a lot because a lot of these are also big retailers, you know, Walmart and that type of thing. So I think I, you know, so the scraping sometimes gets into a gray area of, you know, is this okay or not? I I'm hoping that it's okay, just because this data is public, it's out there. I'm just trying to gather it all. Well, if you do get indicted, we can erase this episode (laughter).

Caroline Amos:

We can erase it and will testify on your behalf.

Nick:

Okay. (laughter)

Raymond McAnally:

I'm not sure that would do you any good (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

No, no,

Raymond McAnally:

but, we'd be there for you. (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

No, we'd just show up and be like, yeah, this guy's cool. (laughter) I mean, I wouldn't indict him if I were you. (laughter) We hope that's helpful (laughs).

Nick:

When you mentioned scraping, I immediately had a memory of the first time I heard that term. I'd forgotten all

Caroline Amos:

(super sarcastic) hmmm, yeah,that's a hard that's about it. But as an actor, you know, once you start getting credits on IMDB and stuff, All these really weird crazy international sites pop up and they always - they'll list lik your list the information hat's public about you, but t ey'll also list for some reaso your income and my sister c lled me about a week ago and s id so when were you going to t ll me you were worth $9 m llion (laughter). And she sen me a link to this site that sa d I was worth $9 million. And there was another site that said I was 98 years old. And I was like, I don't know, which 'd take the 9 million or lookin like this at 98. Like, y a hard trade right there. (Laughter)

Raymond McAnally:

Oh wow, thanks Caroline! (laughter) Anyway, back on track that. So this kind of what you've just explained about the scraping? Is that one of the reasons I noticed the sources that you give on your site are primarily or maybe exclusively retailers, big retailers like that. Do you have access to like the state sites or the county run sites? Yeah. So that largely just stems from sort of time and prioritizing things. I mean, yeah, so how this evolved to sort of cover all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands was that, you know, I sort of, after doing Colorado and realizing that, you know, I had a lot of coverage for some of these big chains like Walgreens, CVS, Walmart, you know, that are in a lot of other states, I then, you know, I was like, Well, I have data for other states, or I could at least sort of get that more easily. So I'm, like, well, I should start exploring that. And then I sort of wanted to just share whatever data I had. And so that sort of is how the other states were covered. And so that's also just sort of how I've also sort of focused the site, I would say is, in the beginning, that seemed like the biggest, you know, there's definitely a lot of other different ways to sign up or find vaccines. So I, I tried to make clear, you know, to consult your, you know, your state's official resources, to really see what all the other possibilities are, because I'm not trying to be an exhaustive sort of list of all of those possibilities. Sure but what you're doing is so helpful. I mean, I found out about your site through a friend, I don't believe they're in Colorado, but but they were another friend was asking, and you know, and your, your URL was getting tossed around. And so I started the reason I wrote you was, I started to look you up and find out that I was shocked to see that there hadn't been a whole lot of like, press about what you were trying to do. And also you were doing nothing to promote yourself. Like Yeah, even I even clicked on your I even put in your your end website tag for your email address. Just to see Okay, great. Maybe I'll find a bio and it literally says I have a kept it pulled up and it says your name. And t"here's nothing here "is written on the page. (laughter) Like you are not it does not seem like you were trying to profit off this or gain in any way. Even notoriety from this.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah. Who is this guy just showing up and doing a nice thing for other people? (laughter) Like what? You don't expect anything out of it?

Raymond McAnally:

This is America, my friend. (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, you can - its called capitalism for a reason. You can capitalize on this dude. (laughter)

Nick:

I'm sorry to disappoint. (laughter) Yeah, I'm, I'm pretty terrible at self promotion and all that. I mean, yeah, actually, I mean, when I was trying to figure out like, I built it for some co workers, they sort of tested it, and they were able to find appointments for some of their family. And I was like, well, that's great. Now I need to share more probably. But I'm like, I don't really do social media or anything. So I then I was like, I don't even know where to share this. Like, I don't know how to, like, put this out there. So I found a Reddit, like community that was like Coronavirus, Colorado. And I was like, Well, that seems good and specific. Like that doesn't seem too spammy. If I, you know, post something there. So I had to sign up for a Reddit account that day, and I posted it to that. And then within that day, the Governor of Colorado picked it up -

Raymond McAnally:

Oh that's great!

Nick:

And yeah blasted it out to his Facebook followers.

Caroline Amos:

That's incredible!

Nick:

And then from there, yeah, things have sort of spiraled. So yeah, none of this has been Yeah, I mean, again, I'm very bad at like actually promoting things. But luckily, that word of mouth seems to have worked pretty well.

Raymond McAnally:

Well, it's also a testament to how, what an efficient website you've built as well. Have you had any negative feedback? Because it is a little, I imagine it would be tough to sell that you truly are not doing this for any reason other than you saw the need, it seems we're so suspicious these days. It seems like people wouldn't believe you! (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

Yeah

Nick:

Yeah. No, no, it's been a lot of I mean, nice feedback from a lot of people. You know, there's still, you know, I, I do get other sort of, it's understandable, there's still a lot of frustration out there, you know, certain pharmacies or just their websites don't work well, you know, or I'll sort of detect that there's maybe appointments there. But then by the time people get a book, they're gone. Or there's some issues with some providers that I've tried to carry out these that, you know, they'll say they have availability, but they don't actually have availability for both first and second doses, and they won't book so there's just lots of issues out there still. So you know, it's not totally smooth, but, but it's still by and large. Yeah, I get a lot of positive feedback from people, which is nice. I mean, yeah, I've just heard from so many people that have found appointments through the site. And, yeah, that's all I'm really doing it for is to hear those types of stories.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, I'm really, I'm really curious to know how much time you put into something like this.

Raymond McAnally:

Oh, boy, that's something that I don't think I want to tally up myself. I think it's been Yeah, maybe this is just sort of a side project. My work has been supportive once sort of, this became bigger. So that's been nice, but it's definitely still just sort of a burning the midnight oil type of project to try to try to just improve it and add things and fix things. And it's still just you, you're not your one man banding it? Um, for the most part, I mean, another part of this is that I did open source the code from the very beginning. So I've sort of put all of the source code behind sort of the technology that does all this out there in the public. And so that means any other computer programmers, and that is something I sort of solicited is if there's other computer programmers willing to sort of contribute, I welcome that. And so they're starting to be more of that. It's just also hard to like, I'm terrible at project management. And like, it's, I find, it's hard to like, then, you know, deal with those contributions as well, which are great. Like, this is a good problem to have. But it's just yeah, it's so that's what we need. We need a good hearted project manager to step up and join in this. Yeah. And people have definitely offered. Yeah, I mean, so I think I think it's just slowly but surely coming together within the sort of computer programming community. And yeah, there's definitely a lot of interest. And there's definitely people helping out with those aspects now. So. So yeah, I mean, I'm still sort of maybe steering the ship. But, but yeah, some other contributions are starting to come in. And that's really exciting. So

Caroline Amos:

this is really just a true testament to how good people truly are at heart. You know, I think the news is so is so depressing. And there's so much out there that is so bad, especially given the recent shooting that just happened in your state. I'm so sorry about that. But it is so awesome to see someone out there doing something that's going to benefit other people, help other people make this world a better place leave a better than when you found it. So I'm just I am massively inspired and awed by your kindness and generosity.

Nick:

I mean really I mean you and everybody else that's helped spread the word. I mean, that also dramatically helps put the word out there and to connect people to tools like this. And yeah, hopefully it helps. I mean, again, I know it's not a perfect tool. But it's Yeah, it hopefully helps. And, and at some point, hopefully this tool will not be needed. Like that will be a very good day in my books. When

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah. Do you as the creator, do you have an idea when you think that date might be? How long? You'd have to keep the site up?

Caroline Amos:

Yeah. Can you predict the future for us? (laughter)

Raymond McAnally:

Not Yeah, I don't know. I bet that's I think tough to say. I mean, I'm definitely not an expert in like the vaccine world and vaccine distribution and manufacturing and and stuff like that. So like, you know, in certain states, I start to see more availability ramp up in sometimes I think there tends to be sort of some of the sometimes I'll see, you know, spikes, and it seems like there's just a lot of appointments. Oh, yeah. Cuz you're looking at all that data. That's fascinating. Yeah. I mean, I really, honestly haven't had much of an opportunity to sort of look at the data behind this, but it's there. And yeah, so just anecdotally, it feels like I see some of these sort of spikes and stuff, but I haven't really done analysis. I'd be so curious. When you do dive in. I'd be so curious to know if you see a difference in availability between the states that have just opened up to all age groups and anyone and the states that are still like, kind of tier stair stepping their rollout. Right. I'd be so curious to see if it makes a difference at all. Yeah, yeah. I'm hoping to throw more of this data out there for people that, you know, really want to dig into the data to do that type of thing. So yeah, I mean, maybe at some point, we'll we'll know, but but again, yeah, hopefully, at some point, just, you know, if manufacturing ramps up enough that, you know, this just becomes like another vaccine that is just like, Oh, yeah, I just schedule an appointment. And that's, that's it. Like, it's easy to come by that. I mean, obviously, this tool would not be needed anymore. Well, you said, you put the open source out there, but has anybody from from either government or private company? Has anybody asked you consulted with you? Like how you built this? And and what, you know, what, do you want to take it any further sort of thing?

Nick:

Yeah, yeah. So I have? Yeah, so there's actually been Yeah, a lot of good conversations. I mean, it's there's a lot of people sort of trying to help in this space. So yeah, I mean, and that's, I think one thing to be clear, as I'm just one, one person in this grand scheme of things that there's a lot of people doing, you know, other projects. I think, after launching this, I got in touch, I was put in touch with a couple other people that have some similar sites that have sort of different national coverage. And so we've been trying to collaborate just to sort of figure out how to pool resources. There's a lot of efforts happening at state levels, with sort of state specific versions of sites like this. And I also tried to put my data out there. So a lot of those are able to pull in my data if they, you know, were missing, like Walmart or something like that they can pull in my data. But yeah, then I've also been in touch with some private companies that are sort of operating in the space, and as well as government and CDC about some of this. So still not sure where a lot of this will happen. I think everybody's just trying to figure stuff out. But yeah,

Raymond McAnally:

well, I mean, the hope would be that you are consulted at some point about what you learned in the data you've shared, but but you're experienced with it so that, you know, we can build these infrastructures and have them more in place. Should anything like this ever be needed? Again, because distributions distribution and there's a number there's a number of things, be it a natural disaster, which I kind of think of this as a natural disaster thats affected the world. We need those those systems in place those protocols in place, and hopefully this will become part of, you know, what, we're able to respond to that much faster. Next, have you? Is there anything in all the, in all the data you've looked at? or building your own site? And looking at state sites and things like that? And is there anything that you wish? That would be on your wish list to add, but is way too complicated Right now? Is there anything that you would like to see that you would say this needs to be there next time?

Nick:

Yeah, I mean, I think ideally, you know, if something like this were to be needed again, I mean, I think there are definitely a lot more efficient ways to sort of potentially gather this data. That being said, there's a lot of hurdles with that. So I mean, I don't want to just say that this is easy. But you know, if if this were sort of either were managed centrally at the federal level, or state level, or sort of whatever it is, you know, I mean, I think there have been some states that have done sort of more managed -

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah West Virginia comes to mind, they've got it down.

Nick:

Yeah, I think New Mexico as well. I've heard, I think both those Yeah. And in a lot of cases, that seems easier. You know, if it's just sort of but you know, healthcare is complicated here. And it's just, yeah, so in any case, I mean, I

Raymond McAnally:

So what? You're recommending that think if this type of appointment and availability and stuff could be managed more centrally. That might, at least in my eyes, seems like it might be a little more efficient. leadership happen? (laughter) That seems odd.

Caroline Amos:

Oh, no, we got a hot take from Raymond over here (laughter).

Raymond McAnally:

How does that, how does that affect my individuality? (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

Now, when speaking to you, Nick, the phrase comes to mind you can't pour from an empty cup. And I feel like it's very easy. All of us have empty cups these days, just with depression and the sadness of the pandemic and etc. You seem to be coming from a place where you're doing all right, and you're, you're in a place where you can help other people. Where do you attribute that? Like, what's what is getting you through this pandemic? What has been keeping you moving this whole time?

Raymond McAnally:

That's good question. Um, yeah, I mean, I think first of all, I mean, I have to consider myself very lucky in that just sort of, you know, obviously, a lot of people's lives and jobs and everything were impacted a lot and You know, as sort of operating this sort of software space, I was able to sort of move my work online, and I've been basically working from home for, you know, a year plus. And so, you know, I obviously realized I have it pretty good in that regard, in some ways. I mean, that's not to say that working from home, it's easy for everybody and stuff like that. So I mean, there's, there's ups and downs to sort of all this, but um, yeah, I mean, yeah, I don't know about that. I don't know if I have any profound, like, reasons or thoughts. I think it's just, you know, in a lot of ways, I mean, I, I'm just sort of a computer nerd. I like this sort of stuff. I'm sort of an introvert. So

Caroline Amos:

Oh, so you're loving all this time at home?

Nick:

Yeah. (laughter) a little bit (more laughter) So I mean, you know, there's not to say, I don't miss other parts of it. And it'll be nice to, you know, be back to hopefully a more normal state at some point. But, um, but yeah, I mean, all things considered, I do have to consider myself sort of, you know, lucky in a lot of regards, both from a work perspective, and just from, you know, that I sort of operate well in this type of maybe more solo environment, but, but yeah, I don't know.

Caroline Amos:

No, good for you Man. That's awesome.

Raymond McAnally:

I'm waiting for the slew of jokes, or the SNL sketches about people. Like Finally, this is all over and people still don't leave their house,

Caroline Amos:

Mmmmhmmmm.

Raymond McAnally:

You know (laughs)

Nick:

Me and my co workers have been having those conversations. They're just sort of like, well, we like parts of this. It's really scary having to go back, like into the real world and you know, deal with, like, people and stuff. (laughs)

Raymond McAnally:

Oh, yeah. I mean, I've, I've shared that a little bit here that I mean, I grew up always finding always creating projects for myself, always doing my own thing. Even though I had tons of friends. I really enjoyed my alone time. So there's a certain aspect of this that I'm like, cool, I get, I get some time.

Caroline Amos:

I'm definitely panicking. Because when I speak to other people, I get Tongue Tied now. And I get really, really self conscious about the fact that I can hardly string sentences together. But God, I'm I'm craving being in some big rooms with a lot of people. I crave that. So I might be the out. I'm in the opposite position as you Nick.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah. Which That's tough. I mean, that's really tough.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, thank God for FaceTime. Thank God for podcasts, you know, stay busy. Stay connected to other people.

Nick:

Yeah.

Raymond McAnally:

I'm curious after having built a site like this and helping others get their shot. Have you had yours yet? Are you are you want to get it? Yeah, I have not had my shot. I'm not eligible yet in Colorado. I definitely am eager to get it whenever I can. So yeah, hopefully, at some point soonish. I mean, yeah, It seems like the government, you need to write your buddy, the governor be like, I built this site,

Caroline Amos:

Yeah man give me the hook up. (laughter)

Nick:

No, I'm, again, I feel lucky that I can sort of work from home and I'm in a good situation. So I'm happy to wait until my turn, but I'm definitely looking forward to getting it.

Caroline Amos:

Are you looking forward to using your site to access your vaccine?

Nick:

Yeah, yeah. I, actually, my girlfriend was eligible earlier, she's in a different category. And I'm very sad that my website sort of helped. But it was an appointment that didn't show up on my website, because it came and went so quickly on the website. So like, it helped in a way. But I was still just a little sad that my website didn't detect it, because it was only there for like 30 seconds, and I just happened to luck into it. It's amazing. But so that was a little disheartening, but yeah. (laughter)

Raymond McAnally:

Stepping out using other websites all of a sudden (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

Well, thank you so much, not only for speaking with us today, but also what you're doing. It is so phenomenal to see people out there doing some really, really good and kind work to benefit other people. So thank you, man, I hope I hope everybody is is eternally grateful to you, who uses your site.

Raymond McAnally:

Well, thank you for the very kind words. Yeah, and thanks for spreading the word about it. And yeah, just hopefully we can help people and and hopefully won't be needed much longer. So yeah. I really appreciate it.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah. I frankly, what I'd love to do is I want to I want to make a little voiceover recording so we can promote it as many places as possible. You can I audition it for you real quick?

Nick:

Sure, sure. All right, ready.

Caroline Amos:

Vaccines Spotter. This is your place for the Pfizer, the Moderna and the Johnson and Johnson check it out at vaccinespotter dot com? (laughter)

Nick:

Org

Caroline Amos:

Shoot! Hang on let me do take two (laughter) I'm kidding. I'm not gonna make you suffer through that one more time.

Raymond McAnally:

I love that they all got THE's in front of them like their interstates in California (laughter). The Moderna, The Pfizer, The

Caroline Amos:

Johnson and Johnson. Yeah, we'll make we'll make it commercial for you. And it's all of our free time.

Raymond McAnally:

He's like, yeah, I didn't, I didn't ask for that (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

This is Caroline.

Raymond McAnally:

And Raymond.

Caroline Amos:

Thank you so much for listening to Fatigue

Raymond McAnally:

From patients to paramedics long hose to lessons learned. Sure, it's the same virus but these are very different stories.

Caroline Amos:

If you have a question or a story you'd like us to address on an episode, please email us at fatigued odcast@gmail.com.

Raymond McAnally:

And don't forget to check us out on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter

Caroline Amos:

Clubhouse,

Raymond McAnally:

right clubhouse. What is that?

Caroline Amos:

I don't even know. But whatever it is, we're here to offer genuine conversations so we can humanize the issues surrounding COVID and the pandemic. These stories deserve the space to be remembered and we relish the opportunity for connection in this isolated time perhaps, to stay positive, just negative. And thanks for listening