April 27, 2021

S2:E9 Raymond & Caroline | Vax'd n' Wax'd


Surprise: we’re our own guests this week! Both of us share our vaccine stories and experiences. At this point Raymond has received both doses and Caroline has gotten her first. (Hashtag Team Pfizer.) Unrelated but after staying home for a year with unlimited access to your toilet, has anyone else noticed their bladder’s capacity significantly decrease? We discuss that at length lol. We also talk about why we like our podcast and what we’ve learned from it, and we want to hear from you! What do you like about us? What do you want us to cover? How is your own personal pandemic story unfolding? Follow us @fatiguedpodcast on socials and feel free to email us with feedback: fatiguedpodcast@gmail.com. Also head to our website www.fatiguedpodcast.com to sign up for our newsletter and be the first to hear about upcoming episodes! Thanks for listening! 


Transcript
Caroline Raymond:

Hi, I'm Carolyn Amos and I'm Raymond McAnally.And we are FATIGUED (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

Raymond How the hell are you?

Raymond McAnally:

You know, I am vaxed.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah.

Raymond McAnally:

Vaxed and happy.

Caroline Amos:

Vaxed and happy. I was gonna say Vaxxed and Waxxed. (laughter)

Raymond McAnally:

Great! (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

Vaxxed and Waxxed, I'm ready for hot girl summer! (laughter)

Raymond McAnally:

We've got the title for the episode. (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

Oh, man, I'm so pumped because I'm, I've got I'm halfway through my vaccination experience, too. In fact, I believe that that is the whole reason we are gathering together today.

Raymond McAnally:

Why I think you're right, Caroline. I mean, I guess technically I'm not. I've had both shots. But I have not waited the appropriate two weeks to be fully protected.

Caroline Amos:

Right. Well, do you have like so you just got your shot number two this week?

Raymond McAnally:

I got shot number two. Tuesday, April 13.

Caroline Amos:

Incredible. I got shot number one Friday, April 16, which is also my little brother's birthday. Oh, oh, man. I have such a good vaccination story. Are you ready to hear it?

Raymond McAnally:

Do you want to hear it? You've been teasing it for a week.

Caroline Amos:

Okay, so I have a really good friend's friend who is now my very good friend because of this experience.

Raymond McAnally:

I think I can just call them a friend. (laughs)

Caroline Amos:

Oh, yeah. Okay, so then, so I have a I have a friend. His name is David. He's an awesome dude. And he was able to get me a vaccination appointment way back in like February. But he couldn't secure anything for me until April. And I was immensely grateful. And at the time, I was like, I don't care where I have to go get me anything anywhere, and I will make it happen. And so he ended up finding an appointment for me out in Jamaica, Queens, which is like not the easiest place to get to. So anyway, I had a very good friend come into town and drive me out there. And I get out there. And it's at York College. And I go into their gymnasium. And it's very much like, Oh my god, the military is here administering doses of the vaccine -

Raymond McAnally:

Really, you had that experience.

Caroline Amos:

It was very intense. And so anyway, I go in, and I am in love with the guy that gave me the vaccine. He was a very, very beautiful, beautiful man. And he was very nice to me.

Raymond McAnally:

Who would you compare him to? What? Who did he look like? Was it Captain America? Was it Chris Evans, who gave you your shot.

Caroline Amos:

oh god Yeah, let's call him Let's call him Captain America. So I go in, and I sit down and he is like, Hey, how are you doing? And I said, I'm not gonna lie, man. Needles make me nervous. And I usually faint. And he said, Oh, God, well, I'm gonna do my best to make sure that that doesn't happen. And I should let you know, I'm really good at distracting people. So I'm gonna work on making sure you're not anxious about this. I said, All right. Best of luck to you.

Raymond McAnally:

And that's when he showed you his abs.

Caroline Amos:

And that's when he showed me his abs. And then it became a porno. And then I had to get me Just kidding. Anyway, so we're sitting down, and he asks me that, you know, the the preliminary questions, and he says, Have you had a COVID test in the last 10 days? And I said, Yes. And he said, Okay, why did you have a COVID? test? Did you have symptoms? And I said, No, I was on set. And he goes, wait, you were on set? What do you do for a living? And I said, I'm an actor. I did a film last weekend. And he goes, Oh, my God. I used to do plays in high school. And I loved that time in my life. And we start talking, and he's like, Yeah, I did Godspell. I did. 12 Angry Men. And he starts talking about like, how much he loved them. And then he's asking me and I'm start telling him about all the fun plays that I did in high school, and we're like, just riffing back and forth. And he's also getting my information. And I mean, God, we were having so much fun. I felt bad for everybody else in that gymnasium because we were like giggling and having a blast, and everyone else is very, very solemn, like doing their civic duty, right? And anyway, he stops and he goes, this is a weird question. But were you ever part of CAPPIES. And for those of you who don't know, copies are like, high school theater awards, in journalism, where other students go to other people's schools, and they review their plays and musicals, and they write reviews, and their reviews can get published in the local newspapers. And at the end of the year, they have like a big, like, high school Tony Awards ceremony, but it's like happy awards.

Raymond McAnally:

And is that in every state?

Caroline Amos:

It's not. It's in like random ass cities all over the United States. I have never ever met another person that participated in cappies. That wasn't from St. Louis, Missouri. This guy's from Maryland. He had gone through it. And I said, Oh my god, yes. I went through cappies. And he goes, Oh, my God, I did to the year we did Godspell, we won for Best Ensemble. And I said, Okay, well, I'm gonna brag because I would never Be able to brag about this to anybody, but you get it. I said I was nominated for four copies for like leading and supporting and featured roles. And I was, I was nominated for four and I won three of them. And he goes, Wow, that is awesome. And I'm like, thank you. I'm very proud of it to this day. And then anyway, he goes, Okay, look over there. And I go, what, and then he gave me the vaccine, was not even aware that he had even taken out the needle. And it was great. And then when I was waiting for my 15 minutes to be up, so making sure I didn't have any bad side effects. He came over with his Facebook page, and he goes, Hey, look, this is, this is me and my cast from when we did it. And this is us the night that we won. And I just thought to myself, that is so awesome. And I just loved the fact that he and I who have come from completely different worlds, were able to like come together for a vaccine have all of this cool shit in common. And on top of it, I didn't even faint. I didn't even feel the need to faint. It was incredible. And I am just really happy that I had that experience.

Raymond McAnally:

Well, hot people have that power.

Caroline Amos:

Oh, yeah, he was really hot too. So stay tuned, because I have to go back on May 7, and I told him I asked if he was going to be there. And he said yes, that I'm going to totally request him.

Raymond McAnally:

And you know, unintentional PSA, guys, this goes out to all the hot people out there. Do your civic duty and get out there and be shot administers you can you can be a beautiful distraction for someone like Carolyn.

Caroline Amos:

Yes. For someone like me who needs beautiful distractions in my life. (laughter) God, I'm pathetic.

Raymond McAnally:

I had - so my experience. I went to the same place for both shots. And it was at a hospital that had turned their parking lot into a drive-in situation. So you never even have to leave your car.

Caroline Amos:

Oh, that's so LA. (laughter)

Raymond McAnally:

It is very LA. (laughter) But I think they were also the first hospital here to do that. I think there's a few sites like that now. But they had it down, man. I mean, you You didn't have to worry about anything. They delivered the shot in no time. And then they had a big projected clock up on the wall. And so you got to sit there and watch your countdown and they came around checked on you is really really well done. I'd so I don't know everybody was masked and in scrubs. And

Caroline Amos:

But were there any hot people though?

Raymond McAnally:

That's what I'm saying? I'm not sure. I'm not sure if they were hot or not. They all had pretty eyes. All of them I could see. And they they were very serious about it, for the most part because they were medical professionals.

Caroline Amos:

Oh, good. I would hope they would be serious about

Raymond McAnally:

Although I did. So that my first shot. I it (laughs) had a question. And this is a good thing for us to cover. I asked the person administering the shot. I don't know. I'm assuming she was a nurse maybe? But I'm not sure what her medical background was. But she I asked her, you know, I've had COVID. And she asked when how far out I was. And I asked you know, what am I going to have side effects from the first or second dose? Because everything I was finding online was kind of murky on that you find plenty of information for the general public, but not necessarily for people who've had COVID. And there's even been it wasn't misinformation. It was I think a lot of times people confuse scientific questioning for inf rmation for finished pol shed information. So -

Caroline Amos:

That's a good point.

Raymond McAnally:

So there had been stuff in January, February and March saying we're not sure what effects This is going to have on people who have had COVID and so I asked you know, because guess what? People you should be asking medical professionals these questions.

Caroline Amos:

Wait, you mean to say that I shouldn't go on Facebook and ask a bunch of my random peers their opinions and then take it for scientific facts

Raymond McAnally:

(Sarcastic Whisper) Uh...Yeah,

Caroline Amos:

oh shit! (laughs)

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah. Because I mean our Facebook degrees they're valid now. All of our Facebook degrees and we all have multiple Oh, yes. In fields of science and law and government.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, we just know everything these days. God

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, this actually for our audience. This goes back to a conversation Carolina and I were having this morning off mic about. I was on one of the COVID forums and somebody had asked the group - they said that they had gone to the doctor and the doctor had said Your, it looks like you might develop blood clots or be prone to blood clots, please take an aspirin a day until we can do more evaluation blah, blah, blah. And she was saying, This is what the doctor told me. I want to know what you guys think. Should I take this aspirin?

Caroline Amos:

Like, why the fuck would you ask a bunch of random ass humans in that? Like, no!

Raymond McAnally:

This isn't even like asking her friends is asking a bunch of strangers on a COVID forum.

Caroline Amos:

No way.

Raymond McAnally:

And of course, people immediately started to chime in with with their information. And I said, I'm not trying to be a smartass. But I really think you should do what the doctor said.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah,

Raymond McAnally:

And at most, before you pop that aspirin in your face, ask another doctor, not a bunch of people on Facebook.

Caroline Amos:

Did you get super cancelled after that, Raymond?

Raymond McAnally:

No, actually a ton of people liked my posts. She did not she did not think I was being helpful.

Caroline Amos:

Oh, well, you know what, honestly, she can do whatever the fuck she wants. Like, I don't I don't care if that's how you want to go about your scientific endeavors in your life. Go for it. Go for it. I don't care. Go for it.

Raymond McAnally:

And I realized the irony of us talking about this while also trying to do a podcast on COVID. But we do not offer medical advice.

Caroline Amos:

No, we just talk about shit. We just have fun.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, we ask professionals their questions.

Caroline Amos:

Yes, we do. Wait. So go back to what you were talking about. Before we were talking about you know, so you asked your doctor a question.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, I asked. I asked the person administering the shot. Am I going to have side effects? What What should I know as somebody who's had COVID getting my first shot. And she said you will most likely have side effects from the first dose instead of the second dose. Because we've all read by now, usually that anybody who has a second dose who hasn't had COVID tends to have a reaction to the second dose, it doesn't matter which vaccine. But just like everything else with COVID, yay, it's all different for everybody.

Caroline Amos:

We don't know anything.

Raymond McAnally:

Never gonna find out (laughter) anyway. But she said I was more likely to have side effects, because the assumption would be that I have antibodies in my system, which is why people who don't have it have a reaction to the second dose, and all of it and we've heard medical professionals saying this, but it's good to reiterate. All of it is a sign that the vaccine is doing its job.

Caroline Amos:

Yes.

Raymond McAnally:

Right. When you exhibit symptoms, side effects, whatever you want to call them, it means your body's reacting. And that's what it's supposed to do. You're not actually fighting something off, but your body is building the antibodies. It needs to do that.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, so that's cool. Yeah, that is pretty cool.

Raymond McAnally:

So I I ended up for my first dose, I did have a reaction. So that's what I guess we should talk about because you are on your first dose. Yeah, I had about four hours after I felt fine until about four hours after my arm started to get sore. And I did have chills for about four, four or five hours. No fever. Wow. Which was the same thing that happened to me when I had COVID I never ran a fever, but I had chills.

Caroline Amos:

Hmm. So I got mine on Friday afternoon, and I run out to the car to my friend here. And I'm like, Oh my God, this really really hot guy gave me the vaccine. Bah bah, bah, bah, bah. Like, I'm like riding like I'm walking on sunshine. Wha Oh, I get in the car. And 30 minutes later I am suddenly it feels like I got hit with a horse tranquilizer. Really, I was suddenly like, Oh, I need to be asleep right now. And we got back in and I was almost like falling asleep walking up the stairs. I was sitting on the couch. We were eating some falafel. And I like ate some and then fell asleep on his shoulder for a little bit and then he was -

Raymond McAnally:

You don't want to fall asleep eating falafel.

Caroline Amos:

You really don't. It's way too well, we do it up with like the sauces and things like we're professionals. falafel. Yeah. But But still, but then, um, I went into my room and I fell asleep for I think three and a half to four hours. And I woke up and I felt totally fine. Um, my arm hurt. And as the night went on, my arm started to hurt more. So I took some ibuprofen pm and I went to bed and the next morning, which was yesterday. Yesterday, my arm hurt a little bit if I lifted it and today I can pretty much Yeah, today it's it just feels like I have like a bruise on my shoulder. But it doesn't really hurt the whole arm now, and I feel fine. I'm actually really surprised I didn't have more of a bad reaction. I was really, really expecting. Since my COVID case was so bad. I was anticipating having a really bad react To the vaccine, and I'm glad that I didn't so far. It makes me wonder what I'm going to do when I get vaccine number two, because I wonder, did my antibodies run out? I still had them in December. But it's April. I wonder if I still have antibodies?

Raymond McAnally:

I don't know. I mean, that is one of the questions they're already saying, because we're, we're both team Pfizer -

Caroline Amos:

Team Pfizer Unite!!

Raymond McAnally:

So they're already saying Pfizer is anticipating that we're going to need boosters in six months.

Caroline Amos:

You know what, honestly, great, let's do it. Let's do that. Because I'm so scared of needles. This is a great way to experience I'm facing my fear head on, and I get give me a booster shot.

Raymond McAnally:

I mean, that's essentially what the flu shot every year is, is a booster. I believe.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, you know, I am not the person to ask because I didn't get my first flu shot as an adult until this year. So

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, well, I will, I will fully admit that it is. It's a big deal. For me and my medical history to be on the vaccination train the way I am. I've never been anti vaccination. But I've never been one to go out and get my flu shot. The only time the only years I ever got the flu. Were the years that I got the flu shot, which happened twice. And I decided for the second time I was like, I'm done with this. And so I've been one of those people. But now I gladly went out and got this vaccination because it wouldn't even have mattered. How many how many symptoms might have manifested or side effects might have manifested after having COVID the fact that you could tell me I'll pretty much be fine. In 48 hours. Like hit me with it. I yeah, I will take that over the giant unknown my symptoms lasted two months, yours lasted over four months.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, the fatigue lasted well into December for me. So July to December. That's even as long as I'm Yeah. Um, I didn't I never got the flu shot not because I'm anti Vax, which I am not, I am pro vaccination. I just don't get them because needles freak me out. And I don't want to worry about fainting. You know, so I just feel like I felt like, there was a time before I was an absolute big old baby about it. And now I'm an adult, and I'll get all the vaccines and booster shots ever, like bring it on Maybe this can help that too, because there's a big difference between in the needle and the whole interaction with it when it's blood draw versus getting a shot of something. Sorry (laughs) Caroline is turning green. I had a lot of machismo about that just now. And the second that you started going into more detail. Like just I don't feel good anymore.

Raymond McAnally:

I can I can keep going.

Caroline Amos:

Don't stop please don't. Oh, man.

Raymond McAnally:

Going back to what you were talking about, with getting hit with feeling like you needed to go to sleep right away. Yeah, both of my shots. I realized after the fact that I wasn't sure how much of my fatigue after the shot might have been psychosomatic or might have been even related to a side effect, because I wasn't sleeping well leading up to the shot because I kind of anticipated being down so I wonder I just wonder how much the subconscious I've heard their side effects getting the shot. You know, should I clear my schedule worked to do all that kind of stuff. I wonder how much that kind of made made me crash after regardless of side effects.

Caroline Amos:

Well there's like the the anticipation, you know, like I woke up just I didn't even have coffee in the morning. I got mine. Because I thought to myself, I want to drink a lot of water. I want to take my vitamins, I want to have a nice big breakfast and be like, you know, have sound body and mind before I go in. Maybe I crashed because it was the first morning. I haven't had coffee in a year. Maybe it was because of the anxiety. Maybe it's also because my body was like, oh, Caroline, you're putting COVID in our system. We know how to fight this. Like, I don't know, maybe, you know, it could be a number of things. I will say it really it felt like I had taken us a very intensely and I was suddenly like, Whoa, I am I need to be asleep like it wasn't just like regular kind of fatigue or exhaustion. It was like I need to be I need to be asleep. I need to go hybernate.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, I think that is different.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, I

Raymond McAnally:

think that is different.

Caroline Amos:

Right? I mean, I certainly anxiety.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah. I thought a lot about our conversation in January our episode. With the, the vaccine trial recipient,

Caroline Amos:

yeah. Oh, Louis.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, Louis, and how much you know, here. He knows, he knew for a fact that he had the vaccine and not a placebo. And he had been around. I can't remember how many he said in the episode, but he said he'd been around multiple exposure situations and never gotten it. Yeah. And so here he is pushing pretty close to a year with it in his system with a vaccine in the system. And in a fun way, I was like, that conversation from our podcast, helped me through the decision and and every time I read an article about the Pfizer vaccine and all that stuff, it helped me understand the process better and how much research had gone into the safety of the vaccine. So in a fun way, it was almost like being an audience member. And listening to what we were trying to do here and benefiting from it.

Caroline Amos:

I love the way that you just put that it's in just talking about doing this podcast, I feel like we sort of have a leading edge on like, sort of the conversations everybody's having about about COVID. I found his words and his experience extremely comforting. And I mean, there was no doubt in my mind that I was going to get the vaccine. I mean, I would so much rather, I would so much rather risk at all for this, like I don't, this thing is so awful, and so horrendous. I would I would risk it all for this. And it is really cool to look at, like where we are. I mean, I'm eager to see where we are a few months from now. What's the conversation about the booster going to be like? How is our country going to be doing? Are we going to be doing? Are we going to be happier? Are we going to be healthier? Are we going to be going back to work? stimulating the economy by outrageous spending, because we've been doing nothing here for a year. I'm really I'm interested to see what's what's going to come up with this. I really want to know what once you're like officially like you know, you got the vaccination. It is like, you know, engaged in on your system. What are you gonna do? Are you gonna go out and treat yourself you're gonna go have a nice time. What's What's your plan?

Raymond McAnally:

Well, now that I'm a personal mobile hotspot, I'm going to take the show on the road, and I'm going to be a human Wi Fi tower.

Caroline Amos:

Oh, because they injected you with 5g?

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, spreading my 5g to the world.

Caroline Amos:

Wow, that's so inspiring.

Raymond McAnally:

We are feeling like our lives are getting to open up again. We're trying to still be smart. We still wear masks when we go out when he just got her second shot. So we will both be fully vaccinated by the end of the month womb. And just in time for our 10 year wedding anniversary. Yes. So we're actually going to go we've we've booked place to stay in wine country, and it's got a national park nearby. Which I've never even though I caught COVID at the National Park, I have never stopped loving national parks and going to national parks. So

Caroline Amos:

I love that

Raymond McAnally:

You know, don't declare hate the game. (laughter) But so yeah, but and that's something we I mean, I had done a little bit of camping but and hiking or, or traveling during the day hikes and coming back sort of stuff during this, but this will be the first time other than last August when we stayed in a hotel once on a road trip to get to family. This will be the first time that we've done a hotel. Yeah. And that's a big deal. That's, you know, I know there's people who've been traveling this whole time. And they might think that this is kind of outrageous, but we found even just running around the Los Angeles area because you know, it takes us an hour to get to the beach, and you get to the beach and you need to use the bathroom. And there's no public restrooms open because of COVID. I mean, that's happened throughout the pandemic. So there there were times with the opening and closing that you couldn't I mean, you really couldn't leave your house because of logistics.

Caroline Amos:

Well, what's interesting about the bathroom situation is that we've all been inside and bathrooms are so easily accessible if you're just you know, meandering around your home. Yeah, my bladder has shrunk. I cannot hold in my pee as long as I used to. And that's gonna be really weird. That that collective relearning of toilet training for adult is gonna be wild because I went to we went to Soho yesterday because I wanted to go I wanted to Go buy a few things because I have no reason I just wanted to be nice to myself and treat myself to some items. But I went down to Soho, and we just drove down and parked, and the second we got there, I was like, Oh, fuck, I gotta go pee right now. And I just peed 45 minutes ago, and now I gotta pee again. And we were standing in line somewhere, and I was like, Oh my god, I gotta pee again, and I just peed 45 minutes ago, I have no threshold. I guess I really should stop drinking liquids in general.

Raymond McAnally:

But it's true, though. And I learned it when I started to just be more more remote, you know, working even even pre pandemic, I would have to leave and go do something that wasn't, you know, accessible my own bathroom area and and it always cracked me up because inevitably, it's like my new Pavlovian response to using the bathroom. It reminds me of in school. In high school, I noticed that every time the bell rang to end a class I had to use the bathroom.

Caroline Amos:

Oh, yeah. Well, it's because you know, that's your time that you're going to be free. You're not going to miss any class. If you've been released. You've got some time in the hallway. Yeah.

Raymond McAnally:

So now the new one and I and it feels Pavlovian, because it doesn't matter how far I travel. It's not like if I drive an hour, I'm gonna have to pee it if I go anywhere and make a stop my body. If I get out of the car, my body's like, oh, time to pee. Oh, just peed 10 minutes ago. Why does my body think I need to do this. (laughter)

Caroline Amos:

That's terrifying. Thought. We're talking about it. Now. I'm sort of like, Oh, God, do I have to pee right now? Okay, I have to pee.

Raymond McAnally:

years ago, as I was approaching 40, I got worried that like something was going on medically because I, I I was I was having to get up like two or three times in the middle of the night to go pee. And so I scheduled an appointment with my doctor. I was telling Whitney about it. And she was like, honey, I don't know if you're conscious of this, but you pound like five full glasses of water before you go to bed.

Caroline Amos:

Oh God, Raymond Don't do that to yourself. That's terrible. What's the first thing you learn as a kid? You don't drink water before you go to bed?

Raymond McAnally:

Well, luckily, I'm not incontinent. You know, like, I'm just so I eased off that I now just drink two big glasses of water before I go to bed.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, I'm lucky if I drink two glasses of water a day. I hate water so much. I hate it.

Raymond McAnally:

Which is so weird.

Caroline Amos:

Like, nope, the people can't see I have I have a glass of water next to me. And it's only about it's slightly over halfway full. And this is all the water I've had today. And it's two o'clock.

Raymond McAnally:

How are you doing that?

Caroline Amos:

I don't know, I just hate it so much (whining and laughing). You know, I've already got one vaccination in me. And even though I'm not going to be fully immune, I do feel there's a certain level of comfort that comes with having it in your system. And knowing that even though I'm not like fully immune yet, I'm I'm on my way. And that gives me a lot of hope right now. And it makes me not as terrified of the world around me.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, and I think I mean, that's the all of us who have been taking this seriously, but also, you know, just trying to still be normal human beings. I think the thing I'm continuing to check in about, is it because I do feel so much better that I have this vaccine. Yeah. And but I don't want a false sense of security.

Caroline Amos:

Absolutely.

Raymond McAnally:

So where does where does that come in? Because I know that I can be a little more relaxed, about going out, but I should still take precautions. What are those? You know, all that? All that human stuff? And because I do feel I mean, I know me personally, I'm, I'm so tired of all of this.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, same.

Raymond McAnally:

I also know that that's, you know, that doesn't matter to

Caroline Amos:

it doesn't matter to Covid.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, to my prospects of getting it again, and you can get it again, then yes, that would be interesting to interview someone who's had it multiple times. Because there's a lot of documented cases,

Caroline Amos:

I have a friend we can reach out to let me see what I can do. But yes, I'm really eager. You know, I don't think you make a really good point about the false sense of security. I think the one thing that I'm most excited about is I'm going to feel slightly more comfortable going to a restaurant, not going to go every day, if I can secure one of those like pods out on the street where I'm like in a secure, like enclosed environment where it's just me and the person I'm meeting with. I think I feel comfortable doing that now.

Raymond McAnally:

Nice,

Caroline Amos:

but I don't think I'm going to be comfortable going inside a restaurant for a very long time.

Raymond McAnally:

Yeah, I don't know. You know, I just keep checking in about it and so far i that is not as interesting to me. Yeah, we we support our local restaurants as much as we financially can buy, but we we do takeout and I don't know that that's going to change anytime soon.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, it's good to stay vigilant about these things. I guess that's the note we end on. (laughter) Do we was there anything else we need to cover?

Raymond McAnally:

I don't, I can't. I had, I had things. It's so funny. I didn't prepare for this in my normal way. Because this is gonna be you and me talking, just hanging out. But Alright, so yeah, let's end on a call to action. I would like our listeners to write in and give us some feedback on what you would like to hear. Moving forward with Carolina, NY. I'd like to I'd like to know what your favorite social media platform that we're using are? Yeah, can you can either hit us up on those platforms? So we have Facebook, we have Instagram. We're on LinkedIn. We're not on. We're not on clubhouse.

Caroline Amos:

We're not on clubhouse. I don't get it. And I don't like it. (laughter) Oh, oops, did I say that? I don't like it. It freaks me out.

Raymond McAnally:

I mean, it's basically like doing a podcast live. Yeah, we already do a podcast.

Caroline Amos:

And you know what? I like the editing feature. Like, I sound like an idiot half the time and I just cut out the stupid things that I say why would I want to get on an app and just say my stupid shit out loud to do some of that for me? Oh, no, Raymond, I purposely make you look way worse than I do.

Raymond McAnally:

I get it, that's the privilege of the editor.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, exactly. Exactly. I said I make myself sound really cool, man. (laughter) But yeah, seriously, anybody out there listening, let us know what you want to hear about. Let us know where you like hearing it from. And we're gonna do our best to tailor our show to what what suits your needs.

Raymond McAnally:

Because the whole point is that we're engaging you we're giving you information that maybe you can't get from your your circle of friends and people you know. And hopefully this information continues to help people inform themselves and others on what we're learning about this virus day to day and its long term effects.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, let's stay tuned. We're going to have some cool stuff coming up in the month of May. And you can tune in to our socials to hear a little bit more about that.

Raymond McAnally:

And get your shots.

Caroline Amos:

Yeah, get your vaccinations get. Take your shots. Take your vitamins. drink your water.

Raymond McAnally:

Drink your alcohol in a shot glass.

Caroline Amos:

Oh, I love that. Take a shot and take a shot.

Raymond McAnally:

Except not too close together. I don't think it's good for the effectiveness.

Caroline Amos:

Don't go into the go don't go into your vaccine hung over. That's that sounds like a terrible plan. But you know there's nothing wrong with taking the edge off after it's done.

Caroline Raymond:

Once again we are not medical professionals. around your vaccine. Yeah, I don't know. Let's let's call it call your doctor friends. And don't ask Facebook. If that's that's the gist of our message today. Yes. I'm kidding. I'm stopping the vax'd and wax'd y'all. Hey, this is Caroline. Raymond. Thank you so much for listening to fatigue, from patients to paramedics on haulers to listen. Sure it's the same virus but these are very different stories. If you have a question or story you'd like us to address on an episode, please email us at fatigued podcast@gmail.com. And don't forget to check us out on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter clubhouse, right clubhouse What is that? I don't even know. But whatever it is, we're here to offer genuine conversation so we can humanize the issues surrounding COVID and the pandemic. These stories deserve the space to be remembered and we relish the opportunity for connection in this isolated time. Perhaps you will to stay positive test negative and thanks for listening. Bye